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Vegetable Stock Concentrate

Vegetable Stock Concentrate
Another one from the TMX cookbook (pg 17),  adapted to make it Failsafe.  Use this Stock Concentrate by the table spoon,  straight from a jar in the fridge.  As a rough guide,  1 tablespoon = 1 commercial stock cube.  The salt is its preservative.  If you decrease it (I have already decreased it by 1/3), so is the shelf-life reduced.  The leek 'head' is the greener top part of the leek I normally do not use.  But today I paid $5 per leek,  so darn it! I was going to get my money out of them!!!!!

Ingredients:
  • 3 leek 'heads'
  • 250 g celery
  • 1-2 cloves garlic
  • 2-3 spring onions
  • 1 zucchini*, peeled
  • handful of parsley leaves
  • 100g cooking salt
  • 1 tab failsafe oil
*Moderate Salicylates
Method:
  • Wash thoroughly and roughly chop all vegies 
  • Throw all vegies into the TMX and chop for 10  seconds on Speed 6
  • Add salt and oil and then cook for 20 minutes on Varoma temperature on Speed 1.
  • Mix by slowly turning speed dial to Speed 6 then pulverising for 1 minute on Speed 9.
  • Store in refrigerator (or freezer in small lots)
  • Use to flavour soups, risottos, stews sauces etc

Comments

  1. LOVE the stock. We do a modified one to meet our diet needs too. It always amazes me how different people cook, I am more likely to use the green bit of the leek than the white. Although as you say they are too expensive to not use the whole thing. Stock is such a great way to use up all the random leftover veggies from the bottom of the fridge. :)
    agrantham81

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  2. I've been meaning to look at adapting the thermomix stock concentrate so that it is failsafe - so was very excited to see that someone else has already done it. Going vegie shopping today so might work on the stock tonight.

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  3. Can this be adapted to a a non thermomix recipe? Would love to try this but dont have a thermomix as yet.


    thanks

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  4. I suppose you would need to basically cook all these vegies down in a saucepan, but slowly with only a little water? And then purée in a food processor.

    Good luck! frillypants x

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  5. During elimination diet, can you cook a roast chicken, no stuffing, skin on and then remove the skin after cooking? or would you have to remove the skin before cooking. If that is the case, anyone have any hints for not ending up with a dry, tasteless chicken? I'm wondering about starting it in a casserole dish with a lid and finishing it without the lid, or putting butter on the outside to replace the fat in the skin, and covering with foil until the end, or just cooking it in an oven bag with butter and garlic. 

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  6. Hi Rachael,

    cooking the chicken with the skin on is fine... just don't eat it. I have used oil and salt; garlic or garlic powder; and citric acid in oil to 'flavour' the roast. All work quite well.

    If you're on Facebook, there's a group called 'Failsafe Eating Support Group' where a lot of questions and answers like this are always flying around.

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  7. Hi There,
    I noticed zucchini is in the stock. I thought they were high in salicylates??

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  8. hi Katie, peeled zucchini is Moderate in sals.

    In this case I think it's fine to use during Elimination diet conditions, because of the dose used. This recipe makes a large jar of stock concentrate. In any dish, you would only ever use maximum of 1 tablespoon to be shared amongst many serves. So, the actual dose is very, very small.

    I will amend this though so that the moderate sals is noted. This post was written before I had started doing that and I haven't had a chance to edit every post.

    Thanks! frillypants x

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  9. Going to try this with a choko instead of the zucchini, since I have a couple lying around anyway.

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  10. I am delighted to come across your blog as it has brought together most of the very same recipes I have been meaning to try out myself, and you have done all the work for me! (Well, all of them that do not contain swede that is, swede is one of the very few vegetables that I loathe. Guess I could use turnip instead?)

    There are other reasons too, one of them being that as you are here in Oz your recipes use ingredients easily available here. Also I have found that when using 'equivalents' of overseas ingredients that they do not always work as intended - especially when using our flours instead of American flours.
    I am especially pleased to see this version of the TM stock concentrate as for some reason the couple of times I have made the recipe from the book it has turned out disgusting, no not nice at all, no. So, I'm keen to try this one.

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  11. I found the concentrate extremely salty, so salty that all I could taste was the salt, without even a hint of the other ingredients. Do you think that using sea salt instead of cooking salt would make it taste any better - and/or perhaps omitting most of the salt and freezing the concentrate so that it does not have to depend on the salt to preserve it?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jenifer, what a shame! I must ask... how much did you use in a recipe? You should be using about 1 tablespoon for a casserole, for example. I haven't found it too salty personally. But, I don't taste it by itself, of course. :) I hope you do find success with it. yes, using less salt and freezing it in an ice-cube tray to make ready portions would probably work well. frillypants x

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  12. I only had 60g of salt. How long will my stock last?
    I can always freeze in small portions but how long will it last you think?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Bksa, I would suggest, since it's going to be frozen, that you could store that for many, many months. (But I reckon you will have used it before then.) Hope that helps, frillypants x

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  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. hi frilly. did the original recipe ask for 300g of salt? wowzers if it did. im just abt to try this one as im also trying coq au vidka for the first time. btw you know the notamato sauce...i watered it down so it could be put in squeezy bottle-can you forsee any issues with this?

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    Replies
    1. HI Meinschatz, the original recipe asked for 150g.
      I see no issue with watering down Sandra's Nomato Sauce, just not too much. frillypants x

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  15. Im going to make some for my father in law but with no salt due to heart condition.. the difference is, I dehydrate my stock to powder, so im hoping this will store well

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    Replies
    1. Sounds interesting! Please report back with how that turns out. frillypants x

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