Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Roast Chicken - The bird who keeps giving.

Roast chicken is so damn generous. Not only do we get a scrummy meal, we also get stock for numerous future dishes and school sandwiches with the left over meat. Win, win and win!

I roast the chook (free-range, of course!) with a little Canola oil sprayed over it (not aerosol, one of those oil spray bottles you pump.) and then salt all over. No-one in my family likes stuffing except Mr Frillypants.... so he misses out. But there are a few recipes available in the Failsafe recipes books, if that's what floats your boat. Sometimes I'll chuck some garlic cloves in or else sprinkle with some citric acid.

To make the stock; put the carcass into a large saucepan (at least 2++ litres) and cover with water. Make sure all skin has been removed (amines) and don't go adding in all those vegie peelings (salicylate). This is pure chicken stock, nothing else. Bring to boil and simmer for as long as you want, but at least one hour. Allow to cool and then strain into a jug to make it easier to put into containers for freezing. I usually get 2 litres, which I freeze in 500ml lots. Why make stock? Commercial stock usually has MSG or other 'flavour enhancers' or else has herbs (salicylates).

Left over meat is for sandwiches, fried rice, rice paper rolls.... the list is (nearly) endless.

3 comments:

  1. yummy, yummy, yummy!! I love roast chicken just wish they came with 6 legs :)

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  2. I add leeks, celery, parsley, salt and citric acid to the stock. All low salicylate.

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  3. When we went failsafe, I started making my own chicken stock, and I did a lot of reading about the best way to do so. Turns out that adding a little acid (in the form of a splash of vinegar, some lemon juice or some citric acid) to the water draws all the good stuff out of the bones. When you're done brewing your stock, the remaining bones should feel crumbly. I cook mine up in my slow cooker. I save chicken carcasses in the freezer until I have enough to fill my large slow cooker, cover with water, add some vinegar, and cook on low for 24 hours. Yummy! And because there is no skin included, very low in fat.

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Please leave your comments. Especially suggestions to make these meals as scrummy as possible.

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